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Ralph Wiggum

Turbo Oil Supply Screen Cleaning

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Hey guys the new engine in my car has done almost 10000k's now so i decided i would be a good time to remove the oil supply screen and inspect and clean it. I wanted to ensure there was no metal or debris in it from the running in period and with Ninka helpful expertise removed, cleaned and refitted the screen. I took as many photos as i could but its very difficult to get a decent shot of the assembly on the car. With the recent run of turbo failures i thought a how guide might be helpful.

Heres a basic how to guide...

Step 1: Find the Damn thing:Jack the car up and place it on good jack stands.The Turbo oil supply fitting is located on the left side of the engine block directly above the LHS engine mount. The easiest access is from under the car up and over the engine cross member near the starter motor.

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Step 2: removing the fittings:1st you need to remove the oil pressure switch wiring. Then you need to remove the adapter fitting for the oil pressure switch to remove the pipe from the screen. To do this you need a 24mm spanner to remove the adapter fitting and another 24mm to hold the screen fitting that screws in to the block. Its VERY VERY important that you hold the screen fitting in the block to prevent it from rotating and kinking the oil supply pipe as you try to remove it. If you remove the oil pressure switch first (22mm socket or spanner, once again make sure you hold the filter screen) you can use a socket to remove the adapter.

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Step 3: Remove the Screen: Not quite as easy as it sounds....If you car has an FPV oil cooler fitted and has a ZF6 speed trans this step is going to make you cry.. :spoton: The access is very tight. Remove the screen from the engine block with a 24mm spanner.

step 4: cleaning the screen: I used CRC contact cleaner but any spray solvent will do.(ie carby cleaner) Spray through the hole back into the fitting. This is the opposite direction to the normal oil flow and will flush the screen. Once you have flushed the screen spray any debris from inside the fitting with the solvent. Use a wire brush to remove any old sealant from the screen and oil pressure switch. Use your solvent to clean out the adapter fitting.

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Step 5: Sealing washers: The washer are available from Ford (part number: E8321495300) They all come from Ford with marks in the sealing surface from when they are manufactured.(Ninka Tip #1) To ensure the best seal its advisable to remove these marks. The best way to do this is with a piece of Wet and Dry sand paper on a flat piece of wood or glass. A smooth piece of concrete also work well (thats what i did... :spit: ).Annealing the copper to soften it will also enhance sealing

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They should be more like this.....the smoother the better you want to get ride of any deep grooves. The very light surface marks don't matter.

Step 6: Reassembly: The Screen fitting has a circlip groove cut into the inside of it for the screen retaining circlip. The fitting is EXTREMELY THIN . in this area if you try to over tighten the adapter fitting onto the screen YOU WILL BREAK THE SCREEN the scrren fittings are $70 a pop from your local Fraud service center.

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(sorry for the p*ss poor photo but it was very hard to photograph)

To ensure you don't need to over tighten it use the best hydraulic sealant you can find. I use Loctite PST 561 in a stick. Its designed for much higher pressures than a lube system could ever dream of making. Make sure you clean any oil from the fitting with your solvent. Refit the fitting to the block and tighten. It doesn't need to be super tight as its a tapered fitting.

Step 7: Refitting the oil supply tube: install one of the sealing washers onto the screen fitting. (Ninka tip#2 a small smear of Hydraulic sealant on both sides of the sealing washer this will help ensure a good seal). Refit the oil supply tube. This may take a bit of giggling to get it to slide down past the thread but it will go.

Step 8: Install the adapter fitting: Fit a second washer on to the screen with a light smear of sealant on both side and apply sealant to the thread on the end of the screen fitting. Install the adapter onto the screen. Make sure you hold the screen fitting with a 24mm spanner to prevent it turning and kinking the pipe!

If you have applied the sealant and cleaned up the washer as described it wont need to be very tight just snug. Be mindful that if you go at it like a gorilla you risk breaking the screen fitting.

Step 9: Refit the oil pressure switch. Once again clean up the thread to remove any old sealant. Use your solvent. If the sealant is stubborn you a wire brush to remove it. Apply new sealant to the threads. Refit the switch to the adapter fitting. Use a 24mm spanner to hold the adapter fitting to prevent the whole lot form turning and kinking the pipe. Refit the switch wiring

Step 10: The test:Lower the car down and run it until it reaches running temp. Check for leaks...if there no leaks you a champ if there is you phucked up and didn't follow the directions properly.... :spit:

Please fell free to add to this if i missed anything.... :blink:

Luke

Edited by hiddeous

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You've done well, and this is a good comprehensive description of how to clean the screen.

Well done :spoton:

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On my BF F6 its appears to be in a different spot, its on the same brass housing as my oil pressure sender switch.

3 brass pieces screwed into each other, with all the oil cooler lines etc: best get it on a hoist reach from behind and have another set of eyes at the front of the car directing your hand.

Good job hiddeous

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Awesome post Hiddeous.

On my BF F6 its appears to be in a different spot, its on the same brass housing as my oil pressure sender switch.

Cheers for that dude. Anyone able to snap off a pic or two on a BF?

Edited by Spruce

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cheers hiddeous for that how to, :spoton:

it was pretty easy thanks to your detailed step by step info.

I stared cleaning that screen and then saw that circlip. :roflmbo:

So I removed it and the screen came out.

Not too hard if your got small skinny circlip pliars.

Also when I was removing the oil pipe I found my washers were steel washers with rubber seals. :spit:

Of couse I chose to start this a 6 pm on a saterday, thinking I would just heat up the old cooper washers and dip them then reuse them but was suprised to find these.

Its a 02 T so mabey thay hadent used cooper back then?

Any way it all good now, and I know its clean.

Made me think what a waste of turbos there will be with half or more of the owners with no clue of this screen and think of all the turbo with dead lines aproaching :pooh:

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Mine was spotless, but ill do it every 20 thousand even though my engine oil comes out as clean as the stuff that goes in. I over kill with my servicing always have always will.

The oil still goes through the oil filter then through the oil gallerys and through the screen to the turbo. So unless you have very crappy oil in your motor, once the screen has been cleaned I would say that 20 to 30 would be way safe. :spoton:

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this is an excellent article - well done to hiddeous :nono:

I'll be looking at doing this as soon as possible. Actually I'll probably be getting someone else to do it first time around but you just never know.

cheers

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CAUTION

I removed mine today and found little buildup, cleaned it and it looked spotless.

I then checked it by shinning a bright led light through it, and found that 3 quarters of it was clogged up still.

Then I preceded to use compressed air and got it about 3 quarters clean, the last bit would not budge.

I fitted new o rings to filter element as old ones had gone rock hard and this is where I had another problem as when sliding in the new o rings fowled with step down diameter where filter sits causing me to damage my fitler (man rrrrr *#^), and yes I lubed o rings before sliding it in. This also was on saturday after midday, ford closed.

So what Iam saying is if you don't have access to a compressor and something to disolve any carbon grit buildup don't even bother doing it.

You need to be able to see through it or oil won't flow through.

Shine the light through from outside & view filter internally for light, if any black spots that will be dirt.

Ford at springwood QLD had Quoted me $64 for new filter.

I also found it easier to remove air box and access from top not under car as to many things in way.

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Where can you get the sealing washers mentioned in step 5 (Part No: E8321495300). I went to Ford this morning and they didn't have the part number listed :spoton:

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Ok, just got off the phone with spare parts again. Slight typo, the part number is E832149S300 rather than E8321495300 if anyone is interested :roflmbo:

Edited by mbjunior99

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Ok for those of you that have done this, perhaps you could give me a hand here. I have located the screen but it's extremely tight in there. Do you need to take the oil filter and oil cooler off? Or just work with the space you have?

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Just get the bro's car as the guinea pig, then it doesn't matter so much what gets f'ed up :blush:

Oi don't give him ideas :spit:

Edited by EZ2CME

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This got blocked on my car which caused my turbo to seize up only 2k after a service by ford ..

after looking into it more ford never change or look at this filter.

for the $60 part and how fine the filter is its worth it to change it in my view..

I am even looking at a inline pressure gauge to put in the line near the front just so I know there is a flow of oil going to the turbo..

I noticed my F6 was a little diffent to the pics ya supplied but that was only int e pressure switch area .. and I did all the work from the top easy after pull out the air box and top cross over pipe..

but a nice detailed instruction..

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This got blocked on my car which caused my turbo to seize up only 2k after a service by ford ..

after looking into it more ford never change or look at this filter.

for the $60 part and how fine the filter is its worth it to change it in my view..

I am even looking at a inline pressure gauge to put in the line near the front just so I know there is a flow of oil going to the turbo..

I noticed my F6 was a little diffent to the pics ya supplied but that was only int e pressure switch area .. and I did all the work from the top easy after pull out the air box and top cross over pipe..

but a nice detailed instruction..

You wouldn't have taken any pictures?? :blink:

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Ok so I just decided to buy a new filter assy, $70ish from those rip off merchants called Fraud.

Now ive spent about 12 years of my life working on different cars so im quite comfortable under the bonnet.

But I must say that this job was an utter pain in the ASS!!!

I found that removing the oil filter and airbox gave me a reasonable amount of room.

The oil pressure sensor is not a 22mm as stated in the 'How To'. It must be imperial, but a deep 21mm socket is a good enough fit to get it off.

My main issue is I have an aftermarket oil pressure gauge fitted, so the electric oil pressure sensor is in the way kind of.

But its a nightmare gettting a 24mm spanner in there to hold the filter assy to stop it spinning when undoing everything... My 24mm spanner is pretty long. A stumpy one would make it easier.

Next issue once it was all going together was getting the round oil line fitting back onto the filter......This nearly tipped me over the edge!!!

That fitting needs to fit onto the screen perfectly square otherwise it just wont go. I ended up having to ever so slightly bend the oil line to allow the fitting to go on square....

Then its back to the issue of getting a spanner in the there to hold everything to prevent it spinning and kinking the oil line....

Im going to take my old filter assy to work, stick it under the microscope and have a closer look. Ill put it in the ultrasonic cleaner and keep it as a spare.

I wouldnt suggest undertaking this job if your either

a: not mechanically minded

b: have a short temper

c: have ADHD

d: or hate working on cars

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How do you know if your turbo is on its way out? When I change gears or back off under boost I can feel and hear a vibration noise? I know its not exactly on topic but any suggestions would be appreciated.

Also the car feels like its lost power. Ive checked all the hose connections.

Cheers Alf.

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Hanra my apoliogises if i got one of the sizes wrong...i'l try harder next time... :crybaby: seriously though, i had a cheapo sidchrome 21/23mm , 22/24mm and a 15/16 and 1" open enders that i cut in half for removing the screen and it makes the job slighlty more bearable. Its a absolute *beep* of a job to do but worth the efforty in the long term.

how many k's are on your car? was there much cr@p in the screen?

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