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The Daily's Quest for 310KW!


biddie_fiddler
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If Rob goes ahead with submitting a warranty claim, it'll be the 5th one that has been submitted.

 

So far no claim has been fully accepted by them, so I have great odds

Edited by biddie_fiddler
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  • ...JD TUNING ADELAIDE...
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The old FG turbo rumble hey, join the exclusive club lol 

 


 

Yup the 255 has enough legs for 420rwkw on 98 as long as you got the High Pressure GSS342k kit 

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Just what I needed to hear lol.

 

4 weeks left of uni till exams, stressing about not failing. 

Lets just add a f*cked car to the mix for sh*ts and gigs. FML 😭

 

Bright side, gt3582 + externally gated time? 🤔🤣

 

Edit:
I don't think I got the "k" variant of the 255, this is the one I got.

Edited by biddie_fiddler
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In the interest of making my intank module 100% e85 safe, I need to replace one of the lines with an e85 safe version.

 

When I installed the 255 pump, I used a raceworks flexible submersible line, 8-10mm ID 120mm to be exact.

 

This was used to go from the pump outlet to the underside of the module lid.

 

I'll need to replace the other line too as I left that alone. Just wanna know what size I'll need for this? 

I'm guessing I'll need ID10mm lines? 

From memory, the 255 outlet was 8mm and the module side was 10mm. 

 

Will this do the trick?

(raceworks 10mm ID 160mm long)

 

May as well do this sooner rather than later.

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  • 3 weeks later...
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On a scale of 1 - just take it to a shop

How difficult is it to DIY a timing chain and tensioner with the motor still in the car?

 

With uni finishing in 3 weeks, I'll soon be able to afford a second sh*t-box which will allow me to work on the car at home, something I've been really, really keen to do.

I have so many plans with the car, I just need to be patient lol. 

 

With 2 exhaust manifold bolts stripped, I have taken the time to assess the situation and work out a plan for next year with the car. The first question refers to these plans. I want to remove the head myself, something that is challenging but rewarding to do yourself.

I had plans to just drop the car off at MT next year for a bunch of work, however I feel like it would be way more rewarding if I did the things myself.

  • Remove the head and take it to a cylinder head shop for a freshen up, fix the exhaust manifold, new springs and retainers etc.
  • Head studs with metal head gasket
  • Replace water pump (possibly install metal water pump pulley too)
  • Atomic chain, guides, tensioner and crank sprocket
  • Ross racing balancer, current one is looking a bit sad. While I'm there, replace it kinda thing.

All up, this is around $2600-2700 in parts, minus head work, which isn't completely unreasonable. I'd need to get a bigger torque wrench and a balancer pulley too, but even then its still cheap in comparison to getting it done by someone else.

 

I have one glaring worry about doing this myself, and that is engine timing. I have read the workshop manual for removing the head, timing chain etc. The instructions are really clear on how to align the crankshaft to tdc. 

It can't be that difficult, right? 🤣

 

I keep getting told by others when I talk about these things that I should just "take it to the shop". But why, how is that rewarding in any way? With the amount of resources online these days, doing these things yourself don't seem completely out of reach.

If this kinda thing isn't easy to do without taking the motor out, maybe I'll reconsider. But that also sounds like fun lol.

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12 minutes ago, biddie_fiddler said:

How difficult is it to DIY a timing chain and tensioner with the motor still in the car?

 

It's pretty easy when you know how. I would never remove the engine to do this, it's probably 6 times the amount of work.

 

13 minutes ago, biddie_fiddler said:

I want to remove the head myself,

 

None of the stuff you want to do involves removing the head. You can fix the threads with it on, you can do valve springs and valve guide seals with it on and you can do head studs with it on. The car will already have a metal gasket too. Do a leak down test if you are concerned that the valves aren't sealing but they should be fine.

 

15 minutes ago, biddie_fiddler said:

engine timing

 

Literally line it up to tdc, put both cam dots straight up, have no slack in the chain on the passenger side and that's timed. How you achieve this can be difficult the first time you try it but it's not too bad.

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1 minute ago, Puffwagon said:

None of the stuff you want to do involves removing the head

I should have been more specific, realised this when I posted 🤣

 

I have an oil leak between the block and the head, I have had MT inspect this and he's thinking its likely the head gasket.

Its minor, but a leak nonetheless. To fix this, the head would need to be removed. Hence the preference to take the head to a machine shop after its been removed.

 

So yea you're totally right, I have been a stupid amount of threads on this forum already to see how others have done all this without the need to remove the head, but because of this damn leak I need to. I'd rather play it safe and replace the head gasket.

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