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5k to spend on mods


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I have a stock manual fg xr6t with 100 000km on the clock. I have around $5000 to spend on go fast mods. Would that be enough to get around 300rwkw's? If so what parts would be required and who is the best tuner around the Canberra area. Thanks.

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yes, you can get to 300's on the FG platform with 5k (sometimes more, sometimes less, depending on how things go). Start with injectors, fuel pump, dump+cat and a tune should get you close.

 

Canberra itself is a bit of a wash, best to travel to Melbourne/Sydney to get a quality tune done.

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  • 1 month later...

I got a price off a place in Canberra to get around 300kw. It included a full turbo back exhaust. Is this really required? I've heard just doing the cat and maybe a mid muffler delete to make it sound a bit better? The price included injectors but pretty sure not the fuel pump. Also no mention of the stock intercooler. Is the stock intercooler ok for that much power? Thanks guys

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For an FG, the full turbo-back isn't needed at low 300's, just a cat is needed for low 300's. If you want it to sound better there's other options. Injectors are definitely needed, fuel pump not 100% needed but a good idea to change it out as it's cheap and makes the fuel delivery at low 300's much more reliable. The stock intercooler will handle low 300's but you'd want to swap it out if you're going to be doing multiple hard accelerations in a row. If you just want a fast daily that doesn't hit the racing track (not drag-strip) or mountain roads, you probably don't need an intercooler, but again a good idea to make your car run more efficiently.

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What Keith said. I'd do cat and dump only, injectors, pump for safety and a tune. You can always add the cooler later. That's where my FG started. Factory catback is already straight through and sufficiently sized to handle anything the stock turbo will breath into it.

I'd get a couple of opinions too as the Barra scene here in Canberra isn't great (in my view) and I had a couple of tuners try to sell me parts I didn't need or tell me stuff that I knew wasn't right.

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What fuel pump would you recommend for 300kw's? Also if I do the intercooler later on, would it need to be re tuned? Who would you recommend for the tune in or around Canberra? I will travel to Sydney if its that much better? I just don't no where. Thanks

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255lph drop-in replacement will do the job for mid 300's (and beyond if you just use it as a "lift pump" for a surge-tank setup which you'll need around mid 300's). It's best to get another tune to suit the intercooler but unnecessary. Tuners in Canberra are limited, but NSW itself has plenty of choice; have a read of this thread: https://www.fordxr6turbo.com/forum/topic/82602-recommended-tuner-workshop-new-south-wales/

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I've been in the same boat as you @coolxr6t. I've spent the better part of 1.5 years slowly accumulating parts for my daily with 300-310KW in mind as my goal. Imo pretty achievable and more than enough for a daily.

The last part of my mod list arrived last week with intention of going to Monsta Torque in WA for his stage 1 package. I've done the following including current prices:

  • Antz intake and battery relo - $479.90
  • Intune motorsport intercooler piping - $260.00
  • Intune motorsport throttle elbow - $135.00
  • Plazzy 1000hp intercooler. This is extremely overkill but I got a surprise $1.5k bonus from work so I figured why not, looks killer! - $1,290.00 
  • Ultrex Dump and high flow cat - $699.99
  • MT Stage 1 (includes 1000cc injectors and a PCMTEC tune) - $1,950

Total: $4814.89

 

You can save some money by getting a much cheaper intercooler. I'd definitely recommend swapping out the stock one though, its a good piece of mind upgrade that you can carry through if you decide to go for more power later on. 

 

Just checking antz performance and they have a IC and piping kit for $1,389.90. Not sure how good the intercooler is though, wonder if anyone on the forums has one and can give their input on it.

Subbing that in for the above stuff puts the total at $4519.79.

 

I don't really think the intake and relo is necessary for 300kw, but it sounds mint and removes the long asf intake pipe that is surely a restriction to the motor.

 

Some other things I'd recommend you do:

  • External trans cooler or PWR drop in replacement to avoid any milkshake headaches
  • Oil pump gears
  • Turbo oil feed replacement (earls does a decent one)
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What fuel pump would you recommend for 300kw's? Also if I do the intercooler later on, would it need to be re tuned? Who would you recommend for the tune in or around Canberra? I will travel to Sydney if its that much better? I just don't no where. Thanks
Haha I DIY tune for a reason There's definitely some better choices in Sydney

As well as injectors, dump, cat and pump I've got the following, driveline-wise:

-Antz battery relocation and turbo side intake (not needed for power, but sounds great and makes so many maintenance tasks easier by not having the crossover
-Golebys turbo oil feed line (comes with Turbosmart filter) - lots of people say these aren't needed in an FG but I went for piece of mind
-Heat exchanger for auto - this is a must for the ZF regardless of whether or not you add power
-GFB fuel.oressure reg (not needed, but I wanted the gauge and needed a new reg)

255lph pump will be heaps and won't need a wiring upgrade, new fuel reg or return line modification. If you go bigger for that power target you just create more headaches
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  • 2 weeks later...

I think you are ignoring the fact that people have had the OEM heat exchangers fail even when relatively new, yet no one seems to have had failures of the PWR replacement. Have you read up on this at all or just assuming that OEM is better?

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Not ignoring the fact mate. OEM heat exchangers fail due to various reasons. PWR ones fail too. Outer shiny case on PWR is just a false sense of quality. Look for yourself what is inside them. (Many other design issues I won't get into). Even PWR state in their documentation that they do not warrant against corrosion of aluminium core inside their product. Your gearbox won't be covered by PWR. At best you can get replacement heat exchanger but have to prove you didn't corrode it by not following the instructions.

 

If you do your research, you can find many PWR's failed. Their lower number of failures are because of very very low number of PWR's sold as compared to OEM heat exchangers.

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If an external heat to air exchanger fails, you leak gearbox fluid... if the stock one fails you mix the gearbox fluid with the coolant and that lunches the clutches and other friction surfaces in the gearbox and your gearbox fluid ends up in the engine coolant and can mess up the engine and it's water jackets (the dreaded milkshake worst case scenario). I know which I'd prefer.

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If external cooler fails, you lose trans fluid without knowing and damage the gearbox permanently. Moreover there are many issues of installing external cooler and many people have complained of issues after installing one. Some people have had no issues in their specific situation other than clutch slipping when cold. External coolers can cause abnormal gear shifts, premature wear or worse a damaged gearbox.

 

There are millions of ZF gearboxes running well with coolant to trans fluid heat exchangers on Ford, BMW, Audi, Land Rover and many more ZF R&D team decided on it that way after extensive testing including sub zero temperatures as well as desert conditions. 

 

I know which one I'd prefer. But people shouldn't get sucked into unnecessary mods promoted by mechanics.

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Yes, they can run fine if you do preventative maintenance on the stock heat-exchanger.

If you run an external oil cooler good chance you'll have some sort of gauge setup to monitor the setup so that you'll notice quickly when/if it fails.

 

Both have their drawbacks, but one has much worse potential outcome over the other.

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That's interesting. Are there any examples on this forum about failed PWR heat exchangers? I wasn't aware there were any failures.

 

ZF Milkshakes seem to be 'a thing' with FGs, so why would this be the case? Failures that seemed to have popped up relatively early in their life, and with people using coolant.

 

I can't say I have seen the inside of a PWR cooler and compared them to the OEM one. At the very least I had thought that they were thicker and less likely to be affected by corrossion. Any pictures of the differences would be interesting to see, but for me its insurance and I guess I have to trust that the PWR ones are less likely to fail.

 

By contrast I thought there have been people that replaced the OEM cooler with a new OEM cooler and still had their gearbox milkshake.

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11 hours ago, djaolnes4 said:

I can't say I have seen the inside of a PWR cooler and compared them to the OEM one. At the very least I had thought that they were thicker and less likely to be affected by corrossion. Any pictures of the differences would be interesting to see, but for me its insurance and I guess I have to trust that the PWR ones are less likely to fail.

 

By contrast I thought there have been people that replaced the OEM cooler with a new OEM cooler and still had their gearbox milkshake.

For sure there have been people doing this and still getting the milkshake.

 

Its more of a preventative maintenance thing to replace them relatively often. While you're still replacing a badly designed cooler with the same badly designed cooler, you're going under the assumption that the new one is well, new. So its less likely to milkshake. The chance is still there though.

 

Same goes for the PWR. In this case you're replacing a badly designed heat exchanger with a muuuuch better quality one. Of course, the potential of getting a milkshake is still there, because in essence the PWR exchanger is identical to the stock design. Albeit far less likely for the milkshake to happen.

 

For me, I went with an external cooler. It was cheaper than the PWR exchanger, and I never have to worry about a milkshake again. Has its drawbacks though, like the trans takes way longer to get to temp - especially in winter! It has a fan which kicks in at a certain temp and its not exactly quiet. 

 

At the end of the day, its your car and your choice what you choose and what you're willing to live with. Everyone has their own opinion on external coolers, the stock cooler, and the PWR one. Each person has had their own experience whether its been good or bad.

For reference, a lot of the high HP (500hp+) lads I know in Perth mostly run the pwr exchanger and have had no problems with them. 

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Have been trying to figure out how to attach images here...

 

You can do your own search but PWR ones fail for the same reasons as the ford ones. They can corrode due to electrolysis or corrosion. PWR states, "At time of installation an approved coolant must be added to the cooling system. Two simple rules have to be followed - never mix coolants and always use distilled water." and "Select a coolant that is recommended by the manufacturer or by PWR. The coolant must meet the current AS2108 or manufacturers engine coolant/inhibitor standard. Bring engine up to temperature and let cool. Recheck the coolant level and top up if necessary. Use only distilled water."

 

You will be surprised to hear how many mechanics and car owners use tap water to prepare coolant mixture. Tap water can cause pitting corrosion in aluminium. 

 

Below are few examples of PWR failures.

 

PWR-failed.jpg

PWR-failed-3.jpgPWR-failed-2.jpg

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PWR heat exchangers can and do fail

 

I reluctantly install them, but if that’s what a customer wants that’s what they get. 
Everyone has an option on the topic and that’s cool, whatever but when your $1000 heat exchanger fails it’s a even more so sad & costly event.

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You just got reported by some precious sole Puff...

 

Lucky they werent round back in the day they'd have a coniption with the shit that used to get slung round here.

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it's all good :) people are allowed to have fun (unless the OP seriously thinks the discussion degrades the original intention of the thread).

 

oh, and hi @Dagabond, nice of you to stop by.

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