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knoles

So My Flex Plate Came Loose, What Now?

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Hi guys

As per the title my flex plate on bf f6 came loose yesterday. So we pulled the box out there seems to be no damage.

Will I be able to get away with just replacing the bolts or have people had problems just doing this? The ford dealer says they replace the shim behind it but we don't have a new one and I'm sorta short on time. (was traveling home from holidays so very far from home and supposed to be back for work on Monday).

Cheers

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As long as the six bolt holes are still perfict " round wise " bang new bolts in and crank em up and ull be no worries

Edited by JETSNOT

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you need a new flywheel and preferably a heavy duty item or modifed new one to be stronger otherwise it will most likely happen again, obviously new bolts will also be required

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Dunno if the bolts are tty but got replaced because they where FUBAR. I'll try my luck with the original flex plate this time. Once I'm back home it's not that much of an issue to replace

with a substantial item.

Atomic ones are the way to go are they?

Just for people's knowledge the symptoms where a rapid onset (literally less than a few kms between hearing a "new noise" and developing to a point which I wasn't going to drive any further) of a horrible metal rattling noise kinda like a loose exhaust shield or dislodged cat which reverberated throughout the engine bay. Which didn't change when in neutral drive and reverse if it was under 1050rpm. Once past that noise disappeared.

Edited by knoles

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New flywheel is NOT required.. ford dont use locktite from factory I found this out free revving my motor to 7000 years ago !!

I even reused my old bolts with locktite and guess what ?

120000kms later and after 100 dyno runs and 150+ drag races it is fine.....

Save your money , buy some news grade 8 bolts for insurance and make sure to use loktite......

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I think the extra torque would definately play a part. I remember reading through a few of the higher power cars build threads and seeing a few having trouble keeping it bolted in.

Edited by knoles

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New flywheel is NOT required.. ford dont use locktite from factory I found this out free revving my motor to 7000 years ago !!

I even reused my old bolts with locktite and guess what ?

120000kms later and after 100 dyno runs and 150+ drag races it is fine.....

Save your money , buy some news grade 8 bolts for insurance and make sure to use loktite......

LOL. Do you use a pushy chain on your motorbike too? you know.... because it hasn't snapped on your pushy yet?

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Lol dazz haha

Op there is a mob doing up graded flex plates for zf on fleebay and there sub 200 bucks all balanced and alot thicker in the centre area

Been used a few times now and good quality

Just sayn

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Lol dazz haha

Op there is a mob doing up graded flex plates for zf on fleebay and there sub 200 bucks all balanced and alot thicker in the centre area

Been used a few times now and good quality

Just sayn

Cheers I'll keep that in mind if I have any further dramas.

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The bolts do not come just loose, the engine power through the the mounting bolts elongates the holes and then it starts to rock back and forwards which unwinds the bolts

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that's awesome ^^^

oh and 2256 I dont have a motorbike , I only share my own experiences and I will continue to do so because that is what this forum is for whether you reckon im right or wrong the fact is fraud didnt loktite these bolts from the factory, so how much boost used is a mute point when I was sharing my experience.

But ratter's point about elongation has merit...

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Still tossing up between engine out or left in place for full billet upgrade of oil pump gears, but the issue of doweling the flex plate as a preemptive move has come into the equation. (no probs at this stage) There are plenty of stories about this issue, but in reality how often does it occur. Ol mate reckons much greater chance of input shaft breaking. Not much of a skid kid myself, although someone called me a child the other day, I'll wear that like a badge of honour.

 

Having owned the car for a month, I ain't no expert, just a drip under pressure.

FG 2010 ZF 6sp 375rwkw ute.

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Two different clutch packages in 300 km, and two sets of broken ARP 2000 bolts.. 

 Doweled and locked the bolts this time, using  standard Ford bolts and a locking shim. Should be no problem this time (Manual FTW).

 

Brad

Edited by HI PSI

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Brad, Love your work, shared experiences and commitment to your dream, big HP is right there in the face of those who want it, keeping stuff operating and/or being happy with wot you got seems to be the hard part. This HP thing is totally addictive and consuming. Can't imagine the stress and head trauma continually fixing expensive stuff would be, don't really wanna find out.

Previous owner said to me go to 16-17psi on E85 & 450kw, no thanks.

 

Question still remains is preemptively doweling the flexplate a valid idea or just an excuse to spend more $

@Jeturbo when are you gunna read your messages

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In all honesty,  my problems are not isolated. It's not strictly a power related problem either. These engines have harmonics issues at high rpm. This results in bolts coming loose and failing. 

 

We think that the bolts are too tensile and inflexible, which makes them brittle when side loaded. Another issue is the length of the shank on the ARP Pro bolts. When we installed the bolts into the crank (with no flywheel), we noticed that the bolt only had 0.030" of actual clamp, even when thread bound. So we think that they were not actually reaching the correct clamp pressure. Not good....

 

So, we decided to dowel the crank. This unloads all potential side loading off the bolts and installed a locking shim to retain all of the bolts. We toyed with the idea of lock wiring and welding (Tig) the bolts to the flywheel, but each results in a degredation of some kind. Not exactly a desireable outcome, given that we're trying to achieve strength and reliability. 

 

My previous post probably a true representation, as my clutch change was a result of an upgrade, not the failure of the flywheel bolts. For this, I  apologise. I'm well known for finishing the car and then pulling it apart again and upgrading.. Lol. 

 

The point that I was making is that it wasn't a clutch or flywheel problem.  As it occured with each clutch system.  

 

For me, it's a no brainer. Dowel the crank. It's  cheap enough and worth doing if your already pulling out the box/flex plate  

 

Ozywalker was nice enough to lend me his Atomic dowel jig. I paid for its freight and gave him some coin for a carton of nice beer. Thanks again Ozy.  It may be beneficial to contact him and rent it also. 

 

Anyway, I  hope that this helps you with your decision. 

 

Brad

Edited by HI PSI

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2 hours ago, Wyatt said:

@Jeturbo when are you gunna read your messages

Just then, sorry for the delay

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If the bolt length is an issue ( and less than 1mm is) then shorten them. Additionally most people dont understand the procedure for loctiting bolts into a blind hole. This is a major reason for bolts loosening and fatiguing. I just conducted a failure investigation and this was a major contributing factor. 

Edited by arronm

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