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  1. Amongst the rough terrain in QLD, even the largest beasts can get bogged. Watch as Graham releases his 4WD with the help of Bridgestone's tough Duelers. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/BridgestoneAU
  2. Meet TREV; my Mitsubishi MQ Triton build project. I’ll apologise in advance that TREV isn’t another outlandish 79 Series build, but honestly, I couldn’t afford the fuel and TREV is my daily drive. TREV might look more mild than wild, but if you scratch below the surface, you’ll see that just enough has been done to make this MQ Triton work better both on and off-road. I wasn’t interested in wrestling with a 4WD with a big lift, bump-steer, a load of additional weight and compromised handling for the 340 days a year I’d have to drive it on the bitumen. You can read more about the TREV backstory in Issue 4 of the Loaded 4X4 magazine, but this Triton needed to drive better both on and off-road, which meant being smart and keeping this build realistic was a priority. For example, there’s a quality Australian designed and engineered Karrman front diff-drop kit fitted. Fitting this kit increased down-travel by 70mm and allowed us to run perfectly flat CVs with a modest 25mm front suspension lift. That means more suspension travel off-road, less chance of breaking a CV shaft or joint and legal amounts of clearance between the control arms and their bump stops. We took the same sensible approach with TREV’s suspension and had our suspension guru, Brendan O’Keefe from The Ultimate Suspension, custom valve a set of Dobinson monotube shocks. We avoided the remote canister type as that introduces more joints that can leak, and TREV has a full schedule of off-road adventures in his future. Adventures that don’t have leaking shocks on the guest list. Now, all that good gear is tucked away, out of sight, underneath TREV, and while it works a treat, it’s the wheels and tyres that set TREV apart from the average Triton and getting this part of the build right, wasn’t as easy as you might think. CSA recently released its sexy HAWK alloy, and it was available in an 18x9 positive 20 offset fitment, which would just fit the MQ, so I locked a set of those in. That was the easy part. It was the tyres that I had to get right if our intentions to improve both on and off-road driveability were going to be met. I travel to Corryong every year with the same bunch of mates, to tackle the Snowy Mountain tracks in the region, and there has always been three of four in the group who’ve sworn black and blue, that Bridgestone Dueler A/T 697s were the best tyres they’ve ever run on their 4WDs. Those conversations came back to me during the TREV build, as each of them had waxed lyrical about the performance of these tyres both on and off-road. They talked about improved wet weather handling and braking on bitumen, and better traction off-road. One of them even claimed his Dueler 697-fitted Triton, which was resting back in Brisbane at the time, would walk up a track we were struggling with on the day. Now that’s a big claim, but there was passion behind his words, and it’s always stuck with me. It seemed logical to give the Duelers a run on TREV. As luck would have it, Dueler A/T 697 are available in the perfect size (LT285/60 R18) for the rims I’d chosen and the space available under TREV’s guards. With a rolling diameter of 799mm, they were also 1mm under the legally allowed 50mm increase in rolling diameter over the factory fitted tyres. The Dueler 697 285/60 R18s are a tyre built specifically to suit the 200 Series Landcruiser, but they fit TREV perfectly, and he’s taken to them like a duck to water. Compared to some US brands of light truck construction 4WD tyres that I’ve run in the past, the Dueler A/Ts are quieter, in fact, they are nearly as quiet as the Triton’s factory fitted Bridgestone Dueler Highway Terrain tyres. This can of course change as tyres with higher tread blocks wear, but so far, so good. Compared to the Triton’s stock tyres, the Dueler 697s provide a noticeable improvement in grip, handling and braking on bitumen, particularly in the wet. Off-road they are in their element, with a reasonably aggressive tread pattern – they’ve got to be close to being categorised as an aggressive all-terrain – that offers plenty of grip. TREV hasn’t seen any mud or High Country trails since the build, but he has clocked up around 15,000kms, including around 6,000kms of tough outback tracks and a crossing of the Simpson Desert, none of which has bothered the Dueler 697s. Importantly for me, I’ve ended up with a 4WD that boasts well-rounded credentials. It’s a dream to drive on-road and more capable than ever off-road, so that’s mission accomplished in my book. As an aside, if you own a Triton, remember to get a decent wheel alignment when fitting new tyres. The factory settings cause excessive tyre wear, and a wheel aligner that knows their trade will ensure that your new tyres wear nice and evenly. The Bridgestone Dueler A/T 697s on TREV show no sign of uneven wear after 15,000kms. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/BridgestoneAU
  3. Watch as Graham Cahill explores the tracks of Cape York to head to the most northerly point of the Australian mainland with Bridgestone. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/BridgestoneAU/
  4. Click here for more information about Bridgestone’s current offers. *Conditions apply. All offers valid between 01/04/2019 and 30/04/2019 and are redeemable in store. +Available on Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus tyres, only at Bridgestone stores. Full terms and conditions here. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/BridgestoneAU
  5. Buy a not so second-hand car The goal to buying a second hand car is to buy one as un-second hand as possible. What we mean is getting the one you want, in the best condition, for a good price. Here are some tips to make the experience a smooth ride. Not just auto alley With the amount of choice at your disposal, buying a used car has never been easier. You’re no longer restricted to a few car yards down the road, there are a boot full of used car sites, private sales and reputable dealerships. It really is personal preference, however searching online will quickly narrow down your choice. Too small, too big Search for the type of car that fits your lifestyle and don't be tempted to stray. You'd be surprised how many people end up buying a completely different car that's totally unsuitable. Inspection time Once you've narrowed down your options, it's time to kick a few tyres. But before you go, do some research on the car, read reviews and find out what to look out for in the used car you're after. Set yourself a budget and try not to stray too far from it. Just remember, you’ll have registration and stamp duty fees and probably a servicing to add to the cost of purchase. It’s not a new car you’re buying and there’s a chance some mechanical repairs will pop up. Here are some other considerations when inspecting: Ask more questions. Try and find out as much as you can about the car's history. Are you speaking with the first owners, where did they buy it from, how long have they owned it, when do they mostly use it? Four eyes are better than two. If you can, bring along a trusted friend who knows more about cars than you to check things you’re not sure of. They might spot things that you didn’t even think to look for. You can't see in the dark. No matter how eager you are to see a car, never carry out an inspection in the dark, bad light or rain, they can all hide scratches, dents and rust. Tyre tick. You can check the tread depth by looking at the tread wear indicator bars moulded into the tyre tread. These are found at the bottom of the tread grooves around the tyre. When the tyre is worn to the point where any of the bars become equal with the adjacent tread, it’s time to replace it. Body check. Run your eyes along all panels and carefully check the paint job for scratches or dents. Check the joins for uneven matching, welding or variation in gaps as this could mean crash repairs. Look under the bonnet and carpet for rust and signs of welding or paint overspray. Leaks are messy. Check the engine block and under the engine and on the floor for any oil leaks. The engine bay should be clean and tidy. Check oil levels are correct on the dipstick and the oil is clean. Transmission oil should be a clean pink or red. Worn Belts and rubber. All belts should look new and not shabby. Look for tears, nicks or frays. Feel all the hoses - they should be firm and not rubbery or loose fitting. Go under. Bring a torch. Take a crawl and stick your head under the car (as much as you can). Check the exhaust system is clean with no rust spots or holes. Service please. Always ask for the service book and see if all the right rubber stamps are on the right pages at the right time, especially the big services like timing belt replacement. Get behind the wheel If it passes your first inspection, it’s time for a test drive. Take a seat and look around - you should feel comfortable from the start. Here's what you should look for on your test drive: The car should start first time and settle into a smooth idle. Keep the radio turned off and listen for any clunky engine or suspension noises. Test the air con to see if it's powerful and cold on maximum setting. Test the brakes on a quiet road to ensure a firm and smooth stop. Test the handbrake on a steep hill to make sure it’s correctly adjusted. Drive through all gears in a manual - they should engage smoothly and quietly, with no clutch slip. An auto should also change gears quickly and smoothly. Drive the car at highway speeds if possible to give a better impression of handling. Ask for the spare set of keys. If you need to buy another they can be surprisingly expensive. Shake on it Your nan will have advice on how to negotiate a car deal - everyone does! But it all depends on how much you want the car and how eager the seller is to move it on. Best advice - be fair and reasonable. Some other points to remember if you buy: Do a REVS check (revs.com.au) to see if there's any money owing on the car. Ensure registration and service history details match seller and car. Consider stamp duty and transfer fees in the price. If you feel comfortable with it - pay with cash. It's a great bargaining tool! Organise insurance before driving away. Make a car “less second hand” with new tyres If you have any doubt about the quality or roadworthiness of the tyres on your used car, one of the best things you can do is replace them. New quality tyres can improve performance, comfort, handling and above all safety. Have an expert at your local store www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ advise you on the right tyres to make your used car feel good as new. Had any good or bad experiences buying used cars? Do you prefer buying from a car dealer or owner? Share them with us and let us know in the comments below, or join the conversation on www.facebook.com/BridgestoneAU.
  6. Click here for more information about Bridgestone’s current offers. *Conditions apply. All offers valid between 01/03/2019 and 31/03/2019 and are redeemable in store. +Available on Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus tyres, only at Bridgestone stores. Full terms and conditions here. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/BridgestoneAU
  7. Click here for more information about Bridgestone’s current offers. *The 4th tyre free offer is valid on purchases of four selected Bridgestone Ecopia and Supercat tyres in one transaction. ^The $80 cash back offer is valid on the purchase of four Firestone car tyres in one transaction. All offers valid between 01/02/2019 and 28/02/2019 and is redeemable in store. Offer excludes wholesale purchases and all other tyres manufactured or distributed by Bridgestone. Not available with any other offer and while stocks last. Full terms and conditions here. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/BridgestoneAU/
  8. Click here for more information about Bridgestone’s current offers. *The 4th tyre free offer is valid on purchases of four Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus tyres in one transaction. ^The $100 cash back offer is valid on purchase of four Bridgestone Dueler or Alenza tyres in one transaction. #The $80 cash back offer is valid on purchase of four Supercat passenger or LVR tyres in one transaction. All offers valid between 26/12/2018 and 31/01/2019 and is redeemable in store. Offer excludes wholesale purchases and all other tyres manufactured or distributed by Bridgestone. Not available with any other offer and while stocks last. +Available on Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus tyres, only at Bridgestone stores. Full terms and conditions here. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/BridgestoneAU
  9. Hi Focus RS addicts, my name is Beau, and I love this outrageous rally refugee. When I was looking for a new car, I needed something that was easy to drive, had a tonne of power, yet have 5 seats and a practical rear boot. It was a straight fight between hot hatches or super sedans. Eventually I picked the Ford Focus RS. It’s one of the leading contenders when it comes to the hot hatch arms race. Everything about it screams overkill. All wheel drive, 260kW from the turbocharged 2.3L inline-four engine and Launch Control are just the tip of the factory spec list. Doing the 0-100kph sprint in just 4.7secs, the Focus RS is ready to embarrass sports cars twice its list price. It’s not shy with its intentions too, the nitrous blue paint sets off the deep scowling front end perfectly. If none of these features interest you, then we can’t be friends. As I work for the Australian distributor of H&R suspension parts, it very soon became a test car for the company. Nearly every day since it left the showroom, we’d dream up mods and plans for it on our lunch breaks. Pretty soon I worked out what we were going to do, but first, we had to set a benchmark hot lap! Suspension I set a base lap for the Focus RS at the Sydney Motorsport Park on a hot and humid day. While it was ballistic on the streets, around the track it wasn’t as quick as we expected. The stock suspension was stiff and proved fantastic around mountain roads, but at the track it wallowed and struggled for front end grip. The suspension settings were simply not good enough to go 10/10ths at the track. Back at work the stock suspension replaced with the H&R coilovers. The coilovers allowed me to lower the Focus RS to the exact height I needed. The higher spring rates also helps the RS corner flatter, putting down its power more efficiently. H&R’s front and rear adjustable sway bars were also installed to help with cornering. These sway bars are much thicker than factory, and can be adjusted to be stiffer or looser as required by the driver. Tyres Once the suspension upgrades were done, the Focus RS also received an aggressive alignment to take advantage of the new parts. While the RS handled and rode even better, we soon discover the limits of the OE tyres. While it was sufficient for the stock RS at the track, we felt that the upgraded suspension is now overwhelming the tyres’ limits. Under spirited driving, the car began understeering once the tyres were heated up, and I soon found that some delamination had occurred. The 260kW engine and all-wheel drive of the Focus RS was giving the stock tyres a really hard work out, so it had to be sorted out immediately. Based on professional recommendations, I ordered Bridgestone Potenza Adrenalin RE003s. Regarded as a high performance street tyre that’s also suitable for the track, the RE003s received lots of great reviews. It wasn’t hard to see why, the difference could be felt immediately. The RE003s has much higher limits than the OE tyres, and the suspension worked really well with the new tyres to maximise grip through corners. I could pin the throttle earlier in the bends, helping the 2.3L engine build up boost to rocket up the road to the next corner. Now that the tyres have a higher threshold, the stock Brembo brakes feel like they stop even harder. The ABS rarely kicks in now, whereas it was intervening half way through a mountain pass ‘cruise’. Once, I was amazed at how I was easily keeping up with a mate’s extensively modified Audi RS3, packing a lot more power than my Focus RS during one of our cruises. At the next coffee stop, he persistently offered me the RS3’s keys to try and have a drive in my pocket rocket. No chance, buddy! Power As I felt the stock power levels were good enough, I equipped the Focus RS with a Milltek CS exhaust and a Mountune high flow induction kit to make it sound better. The acceleration has perked up, but it’s our ears that are reaping its rewards. The Focus RS sounds truly raucous at full throttle now. Future Mods I can’t wait to go back to the track with the new upgrades and test out the Focus RS. The Bridgestone RE003s gives me full confidence that I can use the chassis, power and suspension efficiently without wasteful understeer. I will bring the Focus RS back to Sydney Motorsport Park to check the improvements the modifications and new RE003s have made. It will also continue to be the test mule for H&R local Australian suspension tuning and parts testing, as Australian streets and tracks are very different to those in Europe. Stay tuned for other suspension mods such as I install the patented Triple C camber adjustment bolts and tinkering with our custom springs and shock valving. For more information on the Bridgestone Potenza Adrenalin RE003, click here. To follow Beau's H&R Ford Focus RS build, click here. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/Bridgestone
  10. The Aston Martin V8 Vantage – The Secret Agent My name is Chris, and this Aston Martin V8 Vantage is my weapon of choice. I’ve always lusted after the Vantage ever since it was released in 2006. The design was inch perfect; it was a bespoke Savile Row suit personified in automotive form. The delicious 4.3L V8 that roars into life then settles into a throaty purr at idle. I can’t help but feel superbly classy whenever I drive the car. When you press the start button, and the exotic instrument cluster says Power, Soul, Emotion, you can’t help but feel you are driving something special, and yet quintessentially British. Let’s start from the beginning, from when I first purchased the Aston Martin. Exterior The Aston Martin was originally obsidian black, but I had a respray in Lamborghini Grigio; a special kind of grey that’s eye catching yet subtle. Black paint is really hard to maintain anyway, and an Aston Martin looks best in steely, stiff upper lip silver or grey. I then had an expensive carbon fibre lip kit and front grill fitted, to add some aggression to that dapper front end. A carbon fibre ducktail wing was also added for that extra curvature on the rear. All the indicators and UK-spec reflectors were blacked out, along with the factory diffuser, to ensure the monotone look. The red rear tail lights were swapped out for clear versions to keep colour uniformity throughout the car. Engine and Suspension The V8 doesn’t need more power, with 380hp on tap from the factory. However I thought it could sound a lot better, so I had the factory exhaust system replaced with a custom made one. Now it makes a thrilling noise every time the throttle is applied. With the roar of the V8 up front and the intoxicating exhaust note behind me, it was aurally captivating to drive. When the V8 Vantage was released, the press gave it very favourable reviews in terms of looks, styling and power. However, in the handling department, most people favoured the Porsche 911, its rival. I could see why, as the Aston wasn’t built to be an out and out sportscar. It’s actually pretty comfortable on stock suspension, and I’d happily drive long hours or through traffic with it. That meant it wasn’t as capable as I liked on the twisties, so I had the shock absorbers replaced with custom Bilstein ones, and fitted H&R lowering springs to suit the setup. Coupled with black 19in Brixton Forged WR7 monoblock wheels, the transformation was visually dramatic. Tyres With the wheels, I ordered the brand new Bridgestone Potenza S007A. I love anything James Bond related now I have an Aston, and the 007 inclusion is spot on. It replaces the previous S001, meaning it’s a quiet, sophisticated premium tyre that’ll eat up miles in silence and comfort, yet has high performance grip. The difference was immediate the second I drove the car out from the Bridgestone tyre centre. Gone was the previous tyres’ chundering road noise, and despite the thin sidewalls, cat eyes’ on the roads were no longer spine damaging. Combined with the Bilstein suspension, the steering became quick and laser focused, responding to every input immediately. The original suspension made it a bit lazy off centre, but now the Vantage is alert, ready to carve a line through corners or traffic. Future mods Where to from here? As is, the Vantage is currently perfect for me, but I think I can do with more power. That entails a lot more planning and budgeting, as miscellaneous items such as brakes and more suspension work will be required for the car to handle more power. In the meantime, I’ll just enjoy driving around this very special piece of British engineering. For more information on the Bridgestone Potenza Adrenalin RE003, click HERE. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com./BridgestoneAU
  11. Fast, loud, some might even say brutish, but there’s something about the classic muscle car that strikes a chord in the hearts of so many revheads. And while the days of a big V8 engine might be numbered, these classic muscle cars have stood the test of time, proving themselves some of the most iconic. 1. 1967 Ford XR Falcon GT The XR Falcon GT was the first model GT Falcon and also the first Falcon to win at Bathurst. It effectively replaced the Ford Cortina GT500s in the 1960s when they were no longer eligible to race. Developed by Ford but with input from the police force which required a new pursuit vehicle, the XR GT was powered by a 289 cubic inch small-block V8 topped with a four-barrel carby that produced 168kW and was mated to a close-ratio four-speed transmission. It was a little cracker of a motor. Available only in bronze-gold paint, the XR GT also gained some extra gear such as improved suspension, lower ride height, Stewart-Warner gauges and some other interior bits. Only 596 were built, and it’s one of Australia's most iconic classic muscle cars. 2. 1969 Expensive Daewoo HT Monaro GTS 350 The Expensive Daewoo HK Monaro was a big success and so Expensive Daewoo kept on going in the same guise with the HT Monaro. But the 327ci V8 of the HK was replaced with a larger and more powerful 223kW 350ci V8 mated to a 4-speed manual transmission. It enjoyed racing success but was the last Monaro to race at Bathurst before the Expensive Daewoo Torana took to the grid. The 350 GTS differentiated itself with racing stripes, different alloys and bonnet scoops. HT Monaro fans that wanted a self-shifter could rely on GM’s venerable 2-speed Powerglide. 3. 1972 Chrysler VH Charger E49 To the uninitiated, the Chrysler Valiant Charger might not strike fear in to the heart. Unlike its Ford and Expensive Daewoo rivals with their burbling V8 engines, the Chrysler relied on a stove-hot six pack – so hot, in fact, that it was the quickest of the lot and a fierce competitor on the track. The VH Charger came with a ‘Six Pack’ triple Weber carburettor manifold fitted to its 265 cubic inch straight six motor. It was matched to a 4-speed manual rather than 3-speed which hindered the earlier 1971 E38 Charger. Producing a powerful 225kW of power and 434Nm of torque, it was capable of accelerating 0-100km/h in 6.1sec and running the quarter mile in almost 14sec flat. It was the fastest Australian muscle car for many years. 4. 2002 Tickford T3 TE50 In the late 1990s Ford Tickford’s counterpart, Expensive Daewoo Special Vehicles was winning the big engine race. At the time, compared to Ford's 5.0-litre V8, HSV had a larger and more powerful 5.7-litre LS1 to play with. So, keeping up with the Joneses, Tickford lengthened the stroke of the Windsor donk and increased capacity from 5.0 to 5.6-litres. The bigger engine produced 250kW at 5,250rpm and 500Nm at 4,250rpm and was mated to a Tremec five-speed manual transmission. It was good for 0-100km/h in 5.9sec, but most of all it is one of the best sounding V8s ever fitted to an Aussie muscle car. Other inclusions for the TE50 included a body kit and extra features inside, but it was the engine that stole the show for this Blue Oval. 5. 2017 HSV GTSR W1 Priced at $169,990 new, the W1 is not only the most expensive muscle car on this list but also the most powerful and sophisticated bits of automotive engineering ever to be produced Down Under. Shoehorned into the front via myriad modifications is a Corvette-sourced LS9 producing 474kW and 815Nm of power. It’s the most powerful Aussie muscle car ever and it rockets 0-100km/h in 4.2sec and completes the quarter mile in just 12.1sec - a fair improvement on the 14.4sec record set by the E49 Charger in 1972. The GTSR W1 is also fitted and developed with many other bespoke bits and pieces but only 300 will be built. What do you think, are there more deserving muscle cars that should have been on the list? Let us know in the comments below, or jump in on the thread on Facebook. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/Bridgestone
  12. The Bridgestone Potenza RE-71R is one of the best tyre choices when considering a new tyre that will improve handling and grip, but remain street legal. If you’re into occasional track day work, it’s a tyre that won’t require swapping wheels. Achieving both a high-performance track tyre while remaining safe in all conditions on the street isn’t easy. There are some compromises that must be made over a normal street tyre. However, the RE-71Rs are as track-oriented a street legal tyre as Bridgestone make. Compared to normal tyres, the RE-71R’s have stiffer sidewalls, a wider centre rib and provides shoulder block to improve performance when steering and under load. The street legal tyre features “7-shaped” grooves and drain water off quickly while exclusive Bridgestone rubber compounds also provide increased performance at high speed and temperatures. Being a softer compound, the tyres will be noisier and pick up some stones when hot, but Bridgestone’s newest “UltimateEYE” helps reduce wear that would happen to a track-only tyre, yet maximises grip in both street and track conditions - a compromise needed to stay safe and not burn through tyres. An established tyre choice in the North American and Japanese markets, the RE-71R has only been available in Australia this year. However, it is a proven performer and in testing at Tsukuba 2000 fitted on a Nissan Skyline GT-R 34 and Toyota GT 86, the tyre garnered a 1.4 per cent faster lap time compared to the previous leading RE-11A. The RE-71R also provided over 10 per cent higher G-forces. If you’re currently competing in track days or drive events with a club, the RE-71Rs will be a noticeable step-up in performance. It’s the sort of tyre that will be appreciated after cutting-teeth on a more street-oriented tyre and the differences when fitting something stickier is remarkable. It can also shave valuable seconds off track and gymkhana times at events. So, for those wanting improved performance and grip, the RE-71R is the logical next step. It will provide a proven advantaged on track conditions that will translate to the street too. The tyres are available in a variety of size from 165/55R14 through to 295/30R20. See all the specs on the RE-71R here. Have you given the RE-71Rs a test of you own? Let us know in the comments section, or join the conversation on Facebook. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/BridgestoneAU
  13. Save more on four When you buy 3 tyres, you’ll get the 4th for $10!* Get 4 Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus car tyres from $385. Based on RRP of 205/65R15 Get 4 Supercat car tyres from $217. Based on RRP of 175/70R13 82H Get 4 Supercat SUV tyres from $355. Based on RRP of 205/70R15 Get 4 Supercat light van tyres from $289. Based on RRP of 185R14C Promotion is valid from 01/08/2018 to 31/08/2018. Click here for more information about Bridgestone’s current offers. *The 4th tyre for $10 offer is valid on purchase of four Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus tyres or four Supercat tyres. ^The up to $100 cash back offer is valid on purchase of four Bridgestone Ecopia tyres. Discount to be given off invoice and is not redeemable for cash. Both offers apply on purchases made in one transaction between 01/08/2018 and 31/08/2018 and are redeemable in store. Offers exclude government, fleet and wholesale purchases. Not available with any other offer and available while stocks last. +Available on Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus tyres, only at Bridgestone stores. Full terms and conditions here. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/BridgestoneAU
  14. Get up to $100 cash back^ Available on Bridgestone Ecopia tyres for your car or SUV. Get 4 Ecopia car tyres from $282. Based on RRP of 175/70R13 Get 4 Ecopia SUV tyres from $600. Based on RRP of 215/65R16 98H Promotion is valid from 01/08/2018 to 31/08/2018. Click here for more information about Bridgestone’s current offers. *The 4th tyre for $10 offer is valid on purchase of four Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus tyres or four Supercat tyres. ^The up to $100 cash back offer is valid on purchase of four Bridgestone Ecopia tyres. Discount to be given off invoice and is not redeemable for cash. Both offers apply on purchases made in one transaction between 01/08/2018 and 31/08/2018 and are redeemable in store. Offers exclude government, fleet and wholesale purchases. Not available with any other offer and available while stocks last. +Available on Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus tyres, only at Bridgestone stores. Full terms and conditions here. LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/BridgestoneAU
  15. Get your car winter ready. There’s nothing like being caught in lashing rain on an endless freeway, with struggling windscreen wipers to remind you of the hazards of winter driving. Yes, winter conditions on our roads can throw-up some challenging situations. So, to minimise the risk of any terrifying experiences on the road this winter, and to get your car winter ready, here are some tips to keep you safe and in control. See clearer Winter driving conditions mainly affect visibility. Low light, fog, heavy rain and falling snow all make seeing the road ahead harder. Clear windows and mirrors before you set out. If you're heading to the snow, carry a screen scraper. De-mist the inside of your windows before you start-off. Not only is trying to clear your screen annoying as you’re driving, it’s also dangerous. Regularly cleaned windows also don't fog-up as much. Frosty mornings can leave a sheet of ice on your windscreen. Use cold water instead of hot water to melt the ice or you’ll run the risk of cracking the glass. Windshield wiper blades can get brittle after summer, so it's not a bad idea to invest in a good quality pair - they’ll make a big difference if you’re caught in lashing rain on a freeway. Keep your windscreen wiper fluid topped up - you'll use more if you’re going up to the snow. Check that your headlights and tail-lights are all in working order. Drive with your headlights on if your car doesn’t have daytime running lights or automatic headlights to make you more visible. Winter is a slug on batteries It’s not only you who finds it hard to get going in winter. Your car battery can also become sluggish in cold temperatures. The ability to start and run your car is more draining on a battery in the cold. That’s why it’s a good time to replace an old one if you’ve had it under the bonnet longer than you can remember. Best Brakes Of course, your brakes should be well maintained throughout the year, but having them inspected and at their winter best is a safe bet. You don’t want them too soft or too touchy - and any shuddering, pulling or grabbing to one side on wet or icy conditions can lead to a white-knuckle ride. Some assistance Most cars are fitted with safety assist technology such as Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS). Check your car manual to understand how they help your driving in severe weather conditions. But don’t let this technology lull you into a false sense of safety. Get a grip on winter with your tyres Grip on the road in winter conditions becomes all-important in keeping you and your family safe. Don’t put off replacing worn tyres, especially when you consider your car is only connected to the road by the equivalent of one handprint of tread from each tyre. When your tyre depth reaches just 3mm your wet grip is dramatically reduced and braking distances is affected. You can check your tread depth with this simple 20 cent coin test. Learn this easy life hack here. Chains for the snow Snow chains are compulsory for 2WD vehicles in some national parks, such as Kosciuszko in winter months. So, if you’re planning a holiday anywhere in the snow, carry a set of properly fitting snow chains in the boot. Practice fitting them on at home if it’s your first time using them. Check tyre pressure Cold temperatures reduce tyre pressure and affect grip, so check your tyres are properly inflated to the vehicle manufacturer’s specifications throughout the winter months. If there’s any question about the roadworthiness of your tyres, please consult an expert at your local Bridgestone Tyre Store. Winter proof your car The best thing you can do to ensure your car is winter ready is to have it serviced. Spark plugs, batteries, engine fluids and timing belts are all things that can be affected by the cold. Slow is the way to go Here’s a good rule for winter driving: everything you do - do it slower. That’s because you want to reduce the chances of losing control of your car and give yourself the best chance of correcting a situation if it happens. Drive at a speed where you feel comfortable and in control of your car Accelerate gradually - especially in snow and ice Anticipate conditions ahead and brake early. Avoid sudden stops. Slow down and avoid hard braking or turning to reduce your chances of aquaplaning. Allow adequate stopping distance between you and the car in front and start slowing down earlier before intersections, traffic lights and other turns. It’s all about safety It’s easy to lose sight of the truth that tyres are one of the most critical safety features of your car and provide safer motoring for you and your family. See why safety is at the heart of everything we do here. How do you feel about driving in winter? Share your tips in the comments below or join the conversation on Facebook LINKS: Bridgestone Australia - www.bridgestonetyres.com.au/ Bridgestone Australia Facebook - www.facebook.com/BridgestoneAU


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